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Counties of Ireland - Dublin

14,334,245 County Dublin Diaspora around the world

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To get to know Dublin is to get to know Ireland, for the Fair City was founded by a tribe of Vikings in 795 AD and remains one of the oldest settlements in Ireland. Dublin also played its part in both the War for Independence (1919-21) and the Irish Civil War (1922-23) – a close look at the columns of the General Post Office and the angels on the O'Connell monument on Dublin's main street, O'Connell Street, still reveal the bullet holes leftover from the 1916 Easter Rising.

Daniel O'Connell Statue, O'Connell Street

Coat of Arms for Dublin City

Coat of Arms for County Dublin

The River Liffey cuts Dublin in half, creating one of the most distinctive cultural stereotypes in all of Ireland: the "hard working" North Side (articulated perfectly in Roddy Doyle's 1991 comedy movie The Commitments), and the "posh" South Side. (It's worth noting that Bono started his poor childhood in the Northside's Finglas area and moved promptly to the rich Southside's Killiney when he made it! Check out the U2-owned Clarence Hotel in Wellington Quay or the U2 secret studio in Hanover Quay – follow the U2 fan graffiti!)

The Dublin "must see" tourist spots include a tour of the Guinness Storehouse which concludes with the final prize of a fresh pint of Guinness at the Gravity Bar which oversees the city (this is the same bar where Queen Elizabeth recently refused the offer of a free pint!). Another must see tourist spot is the Book of Kells. Nestled in a museum within the 400 year old Trinity College in the heart of the city, the Book of Kells is a 1,200 year old illustrated Latin gospel created by Celtic monks. At the end of the Book of Kells tour you are taken through the Long Room, a 17th century library which looks like it hasn't changed a day. The Long Room is just as, if not more, breathtaking than the Book of Kells and was said to have "inspired" the Jedi Archives in Star Wars - Attack of the Clones (2002).

The Queen's visit to Trinity College

Most people will tell you that those lumbering mountains to the south of Dublin City are the Wicklow Mountains, but any good Southsider will be quick to correct you – they're the Dublin Mountains. A quick 20 minute drive from the city centre to Glencullen will take you to Ireland's highest pub, Johnny Foxes.

The Dublin region is extremely diverse, with people from all over Ireland (and lots from Poland, Italy, Spain, France and the Czech Republic, too) coming to work at the likes of Google, Facebook, PayPal and other high tech companies that have their European headquarters here. Have a pint in Slattery's pub in Ringsend and if you listen carefully you might hear all the secrets of Google as their IT engineers have a few quiet pints.

St Patrick's Day Parade on O'Connell Street

Insider Travel Tips

Of course, you're going to have a Guinness in Dublin – that's a given, just make sure you do so at a good local pub, like the "old man's pub", Mulligan's in Poolbeg Street or the 1970s style pub, The Long Hall in South Great Georges Street. Nightlife is a good way to get a pulse on Dublin-, but you might spot some local wildlife in other places occasionally, too. For example, take in an Irish hurling match at historic Croke Park, eating a Teddy's ice cream cone along the pier in Dun Laoghaire (inexplicably pronounced "Dun Leary") on the very odd sunny day or, if you can stand the chilling mire of the Irish Sea, take a plunge off the Forty Foot, a deepwater inlet near Sandycove that was originally kept solely as a gentleman's bathing club, more often than not in the nude, but since the 1970s it is open to all.

Forty Foot, Sandycove, County Dublin

A good tip when you are trying get directions from Dublin locals is to use the hundreds of famous Dublin pubs as easy to remember landmarks along your way to the tourist sites so you don't get lost. They are also good fall back in case you get lost and can also be the reason you never arrive.

Never get too caught up in what tourist sites you saw or didn't see in Dublin as the real Dublin experience is always about having a laugh!

Comments

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Nancy Calendine

looking for any information on father of Bridget murphy (born 1850) fathers name was Michael and mothers name was Julia i was able to find that Bridget was married to Peter Ryan in 1876 in Dublin in St Andrews roman catholic church they lived at 9 Leeson place records show that Michael and Julia were both deceased by 1876 Any information i have found was in the Dublin area I have alot of information on Bridget and Peter but nothing on her parents I would like to find Julias maiden name Bridget and Peter came to Quebec in 1883 with 3 boys Christopher Peter and James they lived in newberry middlesex canada and had 2 more boys joseph and john
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sue michele tynes

looking for information on jonathan murphy he was married to jane (waddell) murphy his son john c murphy was born in halifax co virginiain 1798 would liketo know where in ireland my family comes from
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John Murphy

My grandfather's name was Humphrey Murphy. He was married to Margaret O'Hare. My great grandfather's name was also Humphrey Murphy. He was married to Margaret Hengleton. All of the above were born in Ireland. My grandparents died in Cambridge Mass.
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KATHY Wye

I’m looking for a Mary Bridget Murphy born around 1917 her dad was Patrick Murphy
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Leah Leverett

My Grandfathers name was James Archie Murphy I know nothing about him i was never able to meet him i just really want to learn more about the Murphy's
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Shannon

I am planning a trip to Ireland with my in- laws next year and am hoping to find out a bit more about my heritage before we go! What I know is that my father's grandparents came over into Ellis Island sometime between appx 1898-1903 and settled in NY. My grandma married James Murphy, who I believe came from Ruth DeWald and Benjamin Murphy. I am also told that we have a Duke ancestor who was an infamous forger who was chased out of Ireland and into Scotland.
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Murphy

My Murphy family settled in bluefield w.v. and I'm trying to find where. My family member name thorton Murphy father was an were did he come from..most of my Murphy family lives in edgecombe county N.C.
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Anonymous

My family member is named James Murphy. He was born in County Tyrone, Dungannon, to be exact. He served in the British cavalry during World War 1. He was a dragoon, a hussar, a cavalry sniper, and a lancer. He was wounded after a German stormtrooper slashed across his face with a knife and left him with scars.
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Hayes

Rutherford B. Hayes Ex president of the United States 1800's?
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Christie Hayes

I just started tracing my roots and am excited to find out more about my Irish roots.
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angela hayes

Looking for any information and confirmation on my ancestors John Hayes born 1832-1892 who married catherine Reilly 1846-1926 I am looking for the next link for Johns Father.. John Hayes ?
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brier

i am brier hayes and i wut ti find my famly histry
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Hayes name has a long history in the British Isles, but now DNA and some recorded history says its origin is from the north-west region of the Emerald Island. The Hayes story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup C2] can trace their beginnings to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Hayes surname origin is possibly from the Dáirine [R1b-L513] who found the Kingdom of Brycheiniog, Wales around 300 CE.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) According to research, the Kingdom of Brycheiniog will take part in an invasion of Brittany, France around 500 CE. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Hayes story begins in pre-history Ireland but this descendant will then move to Wales where the family can be traced back to their Welsh tribe Cydifor Fawr. This line and many of his kin will then travel to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 of 3) Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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caitrin65

My name is Catherine Anne. I believe the IrishGaelic ? translation would be Caitrin Anna. How do you pronounce this? My Irish family roots can be traced back to the 1500s on my dads side, and the 1100s on my moms.
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Moirahayes

Looking for any info on my great grandparents Hugh hayes and Mary curran, their children William and John. My father Alexander niblock hayes, who migrated to Australia in 1949. Hugh and family lived at 49 king st Bangor county down in 1901-11.
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Hart-Scott

Bridget Scott born September 14, 1906 died October 19, 1966
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Brad Cunningham

WILLIAM BRADLEY William Bradley left Ireland for Canada 1818 from New Ross, Wexford County. His (2nd?) wife Elizabeth and daughter Ann, sons Jacob, Joshua, John, William, and Samuel.
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Philip Bradley

William Bradley b. 1782 d 1866.. He was my 3 x Gt Grandfather. His son my 2 x Gt Grandfather was Charles William Bradley b. 1815 d. 1884. His son my Gt Grandfather was Thomas James Bradley b. 1854 Fahan Upper Co Donegal part of Co Londonderry Ireland d. 1938 Grimsby, Lincolnshire, UK. His son my Grandfather was Charles Frederick Bradley Snr b. 1886 Grimsby, Lincolnshire, UK d. 1961 Eastbourne East Sussex UK. His son my Dad was Charles Frederick Bradley Jnr b. 1917 Brighton, Sussex, UK. d. 1994 Eastbourne East Sussex, UK.
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Carl Raymond Bradley

We know he married in Ireland to a Roseanna / Anna / Ann Mcgonagall and they left for Pennsylvania USA. He bore a coat of Arms and it was a blue shield with a single Boars head center with a sword piercing it from top to bottom with 3 drops of blood falling from the tip of the sword. His Family originated from the North of Ireland and that his family was the chieftain of the name and they was of the grandson of Subine meann.
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Bradley

William Bradley left from Cork, Ireland in 1822 and went to Pennsylvania USA family originally came from BallyBrollaghan Ireland
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Barrett

Dominic Barrett born 1773. Came from Cork To North Carolina in 1790 possibly with his mother.
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Barrett

Thomas Barrett of Braintree 1596-1668
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Barrett name can be found throughout British Isles, but now DNA and some recorded history says their origin is from the Emerald Island. The Barrett story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup B2] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Barrett surname origin is from Clan Domnaill [DNA Tribe R1b-L513, Subgroup B1] and relations who remain in Ireland take the modern surname (O’)Donnelly, McDonald and Donohue in Ireland.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) The Domnaill name is also found in Brittany, France according to research from the Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique. It is a very old name which appears in the 5th century Roman inscriptions as Dumnovellaunos in Brittany meaning “Deep Valour” equivalent to Irish Domhnaill. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Barrett story begins in pre-history Ireland then moves to Wales where the family can be traced back to their Welsh tribe Cydifor Fawr.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 or 3) An ancestor will then move to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages. Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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Anthony Barrett

The Barrett name can be found throughout England, Wales and Ireland, but now DNA and some recorded history says their origin is from the Emerald Island. The Barrett story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup B2] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Barrett surname origin is from Clan Domnaill [DNA Tribe R1b-L513, Subgroup B1] and relations who remain in Ireland take the modern surname (O’)Donnelly, McDonald and Donohue in Ireland. The Domnaill name is also found in Brittany, France according to research from the Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique. It is a very old name which appears in the
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Anthony Barrett

The Barrett name can be found throughout England, Wales and Ireland, but now DNA and some recorded history says their origin is from the Emerald Island. The Barrett story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup B2] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Barrett surname origin is from Clan Domnaill [DNA Tribe R1b-L513, Subgroup B1] and relations who remain in Ireland take the modern surname (O’)Donnelly, McDonald and Donohue in Ireland. The Domnaill name is also found in Brittany, France according to research from the Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique. It is a very old name which appears in the
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Brilliard

My GG Grandfather was living in Lambeth London in 1861.His name was William Barrett and he was a carpenter. He married a young English girl called Emma in July 1861, he was 29 and a widower she was 21 and a spinster.I have been unable to find anything about William,he was missing from the UK census in 1861 and also earlier UK census returns.I am told Barrett is an Irish name and I think it is possible William came to London from Ireland just before he married.I have no idea if I have Irish ancestry but feel it couod well be possible.
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BRENNAN

Michael Brennon…Roscommon - 1768. Married to Mary (Marion) Campbell.
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Rosie Brennan

Hello all. My father was a John Brennan b1907 in Dunmore, Co Kilkenny. I have been doing my family tree on and off for many years, always hitting brick walls due to the amount of Brennans in that area. My great uncle Martin is a mystery. He’s in the 1901/1911 census but after 1911 no trace of him at all. He was born 18/11/1879 - address given as Mothil parish of Muckalee, Co Kilkenny... Any connections out there... if so I would love to hear from you.
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Maureen (Brennan) Mross

looking for info on James and Ann Brennan. Born 1830's? May have been son Thomas, his son Thomas, my dad Richard, and me, Maureen. Ancestry says Lienster or Roscommon as ancestral places. Would appreciate any info! Thanks!
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Anne Brennan

Any Brennan with a relative from Waterford, Ireland, living there in the early - mid 1900s?
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Anne Brennan

My name is Ann Brennan my father was Harry brennan from maghera his father was Edward that's all I know any help would be grateful.
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Liam1000

Hello everyone, I and my two brothers live in Plymouth in Devon England and our parents are both deceased, when they were alive my grandparants were farmenrs and lived in the Hoath area in what is now Northern Dublin, we are all over 60, there are lots of relatives scattered around Dublin. My mothers name was Elizabeth Byrne and we have contact with some of her brothers and sisters.
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richard brennan

From whence came Sad beneath the shield?
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Preston

Frank D Preston1892,Lillian Angeline Preston1955, Augusta Ruth Preston 1956, 1957 Katy Catherine Preston,, 1958 Mary Elizabeth Preston 1960 Frank Dwain Preston 1962 Charles Mathew Preston, Edward Cramer, Augusta Wall from South Carolina and George Preston born mid 1800 in Canada family rumors Preston was from UK married a Scottish / Irish woman moved to Newfoundland than Nova Scotia than Canada than into America
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Ann (Fagan) Smart

One of my distant grandfathers was Phillip Phagans (Fagan) born 1730, but I'm unsure where. I have tried for many years to trace my lienage further back but have failed.I was always told our family came from Ireland....any info would be greatly appreciated
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Nicole Dirks (Fagan)

My maternal grandfather moved from Ireland in the early 1900s and grew up in South Africa with his sister Matilda in the Catholic orphanage . His name was Herbert Robert Fagan born 1 April 1911, anyone have any suggestion on how to go about tracing his heritage? Due to the apartheid government he decided to claim "coloured" race status to be able to marry my grandmother.
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Shirley A. Fagan Roggen

I'd like to know more about my Fagan ancestors. William John, 1800-1860, Wicklow. Supposedly married Mary Denney/Dennery also born about 1800. At least one child; John Alton Sr., born 6-24-1820 in Ireland. Arrived on November 13, 1850, NYC. I would love more info.
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Fagan

I'm looking for any info on a John Fagan Sr. born in 1826 in Yorkshire England and died in 1904. Pretty sure his father's name was Peter Fagan born around 1792. Thanks for any help. Mike - great-great-great grandson of John.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Fagan name has a long history in Ireland, but now DNA and some recorded history says its origin is from the south-west region of the Emerald Island. The Fagan story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup O2] can trace their beginnings to what is now County Kerry from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Fagan surname origin is possibly a branch of what will become the Dáirine [R1b-L513] who are found in south Ireland around 300 CE.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) According to research, the Dáirine will join with the Dál Riata of north-east Ireland and invade Scotland around 500 CE. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Fagan story begins in pre-history Ireland but many of his descendants will then move to Kintyre, Scotland where they and other R1b-L513 members will form the Dalriada. This line and many of his kin will then travel to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 of 3) Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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MEME

I'm looking for more information about James Stuart Talbot, (1843 - 1892 Died in Queens Co , he married Frances Maria Biddulph Meridith, father from Collingstown Co westmeath, Ireland . perhaps had a brother Richard Talbot who married Eliza McIntoch. ( july 10 1846 - died in New Zealand had about 10 children over there.?
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Melissa

Hi John Talbot. I am tracing my husband’s family of Talbots who come from Dangue, Killorglin. His Great great grandfather Alexander Talbot was born around 1849/1853, and was married to somebody called Anne. I only started looking yesterday so have a way to go, but if I get any further back, I’ll let you know. Would be interesting to see which line of the Talbot family you belong to (my father-in-law is Raymond Talbot, born to David Talbot Junior, son of David Talbot, son of Alexander Talbot - so I’m now guessing that your Alexander Talbot is the father of this Alexander Talbot). It’s fascinating!
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Augusta Talbot

I am Augusta Talbot. I am am American because my French Canadian family moved to Massachusetts but our ancestor Jacques Talbot Dit Gervais (my GGGG Grandpa) came from Normandy, France around 1698. Talbot has Norman origins but is also English around since Henry V conquered Normandy. I hit a wall at Jean Talbot (1590-1673) who married Maria Ann Archambault (1600-1630). There are also some Talbots in Ireland but that's mainly because the French went there and established some places.
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Jeffrey A. Wiitala

Hi..I am American..My Mother is a Talbot..Her Father was Cecil Talbot..My Grandfather..He claimed we were descended from royalty..I am Trying to find that out..Somebody somewhere knows the Truth..Cecil's Father was Edward John Talbot born in Canada 1850 died 1936 in Wisconsin USA..His Father was a John Talbot born 1832 in Ireland I believe,Died 1881 In Dwight Port Huron Michigan USA..His Father John Talbot married to a Hannah Talbot..both born 1792 In either County Antrim..or Tipperary Ireland..John died 1885 in Huron Ontario Canada..Somebody,somewhere has the truth..I seek help..
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John Talbot

I have traced my Talbot ancestors to the townlands of Farrantoreen, and Rangue in the parish of Killorglin, Kerry Ireland. My third ggf was Alexander Talbot, b.1805 in Farrantoreen and d.1895 in Rangue. This is where I hit a brick wall. I do not have his spouse or parents names. Looking for help in breaking this wall down.
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talbs12

Im Tim Talbot, youngest of 6 sons from Raymond Eugene Talbot and Joan Talbot, n?e Corcoran. Mums parents are from Edgesworthstown, Co. Longford, her Father Edward, Limerick City, Co. Limerick, her Mother, Charlotte Banks.. Dads grandfather William J. Talbot was from Co.Tipperary, his Grandmother Anna Marie Hoey, n?e McGonigal, from Co. Sligo. No relations left behind were kept in contact with, so Ive no idea whom, or where any of them might be. I dont want or need to borrow any money or crash on your sofa, Honest. But theres GOT to be some Talbots, Hoeys, Corcorans, or Banks out there
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Christine

My Quinns came from kilkeel down to Liverpool
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Donna marie Freeman

Looking for the Quinn family I believe located in Spittle or Galway. My parents (John Quinn) mother(Anna Dora Kelley) I was told lived in County Cork. Interested in finding heritage of my family. Other relatives last names Gorrivan, Coyne, Fenney
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Quinn

John Quinn perhaps from Galway or Dublin with relatives in Tyrone and Cavan. He had a daughter who was born in Liverpool, Lancashire, England and her name was Mary Ann Quinn. Also, he may have had a brother James Quinn.
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Janice Taylor

I am looking for my great-great grandfather John Quinn who was perhaps born in Galway in either late 1700's or early 1800's . May have relatives in Tyrone or Cavan Ireland also. He went to Liverpool, Lacashire, England and had a daughter by the name of Mary Ann Quinn who is my great-grandmother,
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Quinn

catherine conboy quinn 1813 to 1893 Had three sons Michner 1840-1906; john 1843-1901; hugh 1844
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Quinn

Quinn - why only the famous? Mine certainly were not! I would love to know where the Enniscorthy Quinns lived prior to Enniscorthy and 1800’s but have already been told it is impossible to trace my Quinn family - yet Ive been able to get back further than a lot of people researching Irish ancestry. . My Quinns are from Enniscorthy, County Wexford, today and back to early 1800 John Quinn. Johns son James Q married Bridget Redmond (1825bn) c1844 NLI - daughter of James Redmond and Kitty Kavanagh married Enniscorthy 1811 (NLI) Their son Thomas Quinn c1850-1939 married Elizabeth Brien Thomas daughter Mary Eliza Quinn, my Grandmother 15/1/1897 Enniscorthy, (family in 1901/1911 Census Shannon Hill Urban) married England 20/12/1923, died Slough England 1988 . Thomas son Francis known as Frank married Annie Dixon - fought wars in many places overseas and their descendants still live Enniscorthy today Thomas son James bn 1886, started as a cleaner and was in the Irish Guards went to war - was wounded (shell shot) in France and returned to either England or Enniscorthy. He did definitely return to Enniscorthy soon after and then left again (family said to America? Never to be heard from again - his Uncle Patrick Ann Quinn is still alive but a very sick man who would love to know what really happened to James. Patrick has just done DNA testing in an effort to try to find descendants of James. My Mother only knew her Mother and Frank but had no other information on the Irish family at all. Unfortunately mum passed away 4 years ago age 91 and I only found my Enniscorthy family in June this year. My brother and I have also done DNA testing so I know where we connect up with the other Quinn strands in Enniscorthy and have shared this information with my family connection. 23andme say my famous ancestor is Benjamin Franklin and Bono lol. FTDNA dont offer this. I tested at both sites. Kind regards Carol
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Quinn

Mary Ann Quinn
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Adrian Quinn

Anthony, please stop being so patronizing. It is BC and AD.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Quinn name has a long history in Ireland, but now DNA and some recorded history says its origin is from the south-west region of the Emerald Island. The Quinn story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup O2] can trace their beginnings to what is now County Kerry from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Quinn surname origin is possibly a branch of what will become the Dáirine [R1b-L513] who are found in south Ireland around 300 CE.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) According to research, the Dáirine will join with the Dál Riata of north-east Ireland and invade Scotland around 500 CE. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Quinn story begins in pre-history Ireland but many of his descendants will then move to Kintyre, Scotland where they and other R1b-L513 members will form the Dalriada. This line and many of his kin will then travel to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages.
Reply
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 of 3) Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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Faerie

Looking for relatives of Matthew, Frank and Molly Quinn who emigrated to America early 1900s. Their father was a magistrate, I believe named Frank also - mother was Ellen Kelly. They were from close to Galway, I think. There was another brother who also immegrated and died young.
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Plunkett

James Plunkett jr Meath born 1810
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Rozelle Sheril plunkett

Love to know more on my family history origins etc
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Plunkett

Rozelle plunkett
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Susan Plunkett

I am interested in information about James Plunkett born April 20, 1835 in Ireland. He immigrated to Canada but also spent time in the U.S.A. in the 1850's. So far, we cannot find any information about parents or family, any info would be greatly appreciated.
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JAMES BRADY

as far as i know my great grandad came from county caven , and he had 6 brothers , one was a priest in wigan and i think his name was barney brady
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philip o'brien

I believe my great grandfather Tom Brady was from Cootehill and was linked to the White Horse and Pig Farming. He moved to Scotland late 1800's. My Grandfather Bernard (Barney) had 8 children, one of which was my mother Elizabeth Brady. Other family members were, Tom, William, Sarah, Nan, Margaret
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Ram

any help with Henry Brady 1625 Ireland. present day descendant Thomas Anderson Brady 1927. thank you in advance!
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Peter Brady

I am try to find my relations in usa a number of my great uncles emigrated to USA I late 19th = early 20th century from county Carlow Ireland I know my great great grand father Thomas Brady was born in 1836 and his father Peter in 1794.i know my great uncle John,1886 and his brothers emigrated John joined the us army .he was chief of police in Miami 1960-70s
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Elizabeth Currie

I am trying to trace my gg-grandmother Ann Brady. She was married to Bernard McMahon and they had several children including my great grandmother Roseanne who was born around 1855. I have found a birth certificate for her brother Ross who was born in the parish of Drung. The family moved to Leith, Scotland around 1870. I have had no luck on Ancestry so any information would be appreciated. Thanks
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Elizabeth Kaiser

OK, sorry, my grandmother's cousins were the Dalys. My g-grandmother was Sarah Daly, and she married William Brady, and they had my grandmother, Evelyn Teresa Brady. Thank you
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Elizabeth Kaiser

Would like to pick up connection in Ireland for my g-grandparents, who came to New York in the US around 1900.. They were William J. and Sarah Brady. I do not know my g-grandmother's maiden name, but they were married in Ireland before leaving for the US. My grandmother, Evelyn Teresa, was born in New York in 1910. They all appear in the census records, but as yet no records on port of departure, ship name, or town/county of marriage or origin have come to light. Once I asked m grandmother where her family was from and she said Tralee, so it could be they left from there, maybe lived and were married there?
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Stacey

The only thing I know about mine surname is that is Brady, and the spell has been changed a few times in our history. Also that my great grandfather's father was given land from the king of England, land which my Bradys still own and live on today, which is on North Carolina. Could anyone tell me how to find out was Brady family, I originate from?
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Donegan

Can i get some information on this family. My gg grandfather was Patrick Brady from Marsh Road in Drogheda. His eldest daughter was called Rose. Patrick died in 1893 in Drogheda. Rose died in 1919 in Dundalk and is buried in St Mary's Drogheda. My great grandmother was Mary Hanratty nee Brady. She lived in Halifax, England and is buried there.She died 1904. On Mary's wedding certificate there is a Margaret Brady as a witness.Maybe she is a sister? Also i found a wedding certificate online for a Julia Brady from the Marsh Road who had a father named Patrick for 1882. This states Patrick was alive then. Can anybody tell me is Margaret and Julia part of my family? I have no record of Patrick's wife. I have found a newspaper notice online for
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Rosacook

Looking for family members in Ireland My family Was John and Catherine Brady from Caven Ireland There son William Brady is My Great Great Grandfather. We are having a reunion this summer July 14th. Please contact me.
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chloe

I'm Chloe Hennessy I was born in CUMH
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Hennessy

I was born at March AFB California USA during Vietnam. I was adopted by know my birth name, half of my adoption paperwork says baby Heather and the other half was baby Hennessy. More than ever am trying to find my clan. Know I'm second generation Irish/American
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Ms Petite-Cherie Boylan-K

Grandfather was from Dublin and immigrated to Western Australia in the early 1930s, I think.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Cruise name is from the British Isles, but its origin according to DNA is from the north-west coast of the Emerald Island. The Cruise story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup A1] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Cruise surname origin is from a Northern Ui Neill [R1b-L513] tribe. The Cenél Eoghan and the tribes of Donegal conquered much of Ulster (Derry and Tyrone).
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) Cenél Eoghan will expand across northern Ireland with their cousins Cenél Conaill and the Northern Ui Neill between 500-800 BCE. The clans of Finn Valley have the same DNA as people from Gwened in Brittany. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Cruise story begins in pre-history Ireland then moves to Scotland as they form part of the Dalriada. Descendants of their tribe will then travel to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 of 3) Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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Laurie Ronan Davis

I'm searching for the parents and birth county of my 3x great grandfather John Ronan born 1827. My ancestry DNA suggests Leinster, Ireland, but I know the Ronan name is popular in Cork. The following information I have documentation for: *Most likely immigrated to America during the Great Famine. I'm thinking between 1852 & 1855. Too many John Ronan's to find an accurate ship manifest. *Roman Catholic *Married 1857 in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania to Bridget Bowen also born Ireland 1829. Witnesses to there marriage were Felix Toole & Julia Maher also from Ireland. *Four known children in order of birth: Alicia (1858), John C (1860)., Bridget Mary (1863), Margaret (1867) *Died suddenly 1894 in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania from heart problems *Occupation: coal miner *Could read & write *Held various offices in local government *He was the enumerator for 1880 census for the township in which he lived. There was one other Ronan family living in a nearby county about 20 minutes from where John was living. I have not found the connection, but believe they may be relations. That family was Martin Ronayne b. 1822 County Mayo m. 1847 to Bridget Mullen b. 1829 County Mayo. They were in Pennsylvania by 1856. Their children were William, Anne, Michael, Mary, & Bridget. Any help will be greatly appreciated. I've been searching for 15 years to no avail. I'd like to be able to tell my father, who is now 70 years old, of his Irish ancestry.
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Eileen WITHINGTON

Hello- traveling with 4 friends all turning 60 this year. Looking for suggestions.
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Stephen Treacy

Dublin is a really fun city with lots to do. That said, if you only do one tour, make sure you visit Kilmainham Gaol (Jail) over on the West side of the city. It is one of the most unforgettable tours you will ever do in your life.
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